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Allison Leotta Kills

Allison Leotta’s newest thriller, A Good Killing, asks the question:

How far would you go to save your sister?

As the eldest sibling in my family, I must admit this grabbed my attention. AGoodKilling-cvr-thumbHow many times did my mother say it was my job to watch over my brother? Even now, I worry about him and know there is little I wouldn’t do to protect him.

Allison perfectly captures the deep bonds and complicated relationship between siblings. Her heroine, Anna Curtis, balances a job as a Federal prosecutor, a romance gone wrong, and a sister in jeopardy who might not be as innocent as she might like. The result? A fascinating page turner and possibly Leotta’s best book yet.

Allison is a master at keeping the thriller thrilling while bringing out the softer side of her characters. Best of all, she uses her own experiences as a former Federal prosecutor to make sure the details are correct. If you’re like me, and inaccuracy drives you nuts, you’ll adore the exceptional factual authenticity of Allison Leotta’s books.

To learn a little bit more about Allison’s books, here is an interview I did with her a while back. In it, she discusses her series and how she came to write it. I hope you’ll enjoy watching.

 

DC By The Book: A mash-up of literature, history, geography and technology

Capitol at nightMore often than not, when you’re reading about Washington DC, you’re likely to find words like dysfunctional, partisan, nuclear option, filibuster, and gridlock. But politics aside, there’s still plenty to love about this town, especially if you’re a fiction writer or a reader. Recognizing that DC is the go-to setting for tons of books from super serious to high octane entertainment, two DC librarians recently started a clever crowdsourcing project to encourage the exploration of the town’s social and geographic history by populating a database of excerpts from novels with DC scenes and mapping them:

DC BY THE BOOK.

Capitol Medallion

I love to read books set in my town so I couldn’t wait to explore the DC By The Book website. Once there, I found out that you can join the project as a contributor by recommending  novels with DC settings. Or you can help the librarians map the books that are already listed on the site by finding the excerpts set in the Washington DC neighborhoods, parks, government buildings, museums and so on. There’s also a cool map that shows you the locations where scenes from the books take place.

I couldn’t resist adding a couple of books with scenes set in some of my favorite places in DC to the website.

Allison Leotta opens DISCRETION Discretion-paperback-cvr-thumbwith a young woman, Caroline, dressed like a K Street lobbyist in an “ivory St. John suit, Manolo heels,” entering the Capitol through the Senate-side for a private, evening appointment with a congressman. Except Caroline is not a lobbyist; she is an expensive prostitute. A staffer walks her through the Capitol to his boss’s personal office. On the way, they pass through the magnificent Brumidi Corridors—“the most beautiful corridor Caroline had ever seen.”

Brumidi Corridors 2

Caroline pauses in the Rotunda—“the ceremonial heart of the Capitol”— to admire Brumidi’s masterpiece on the domed ceiling:  “The Apotheosis of Washington, a fresco painting of the first President depicted as a god among angels.”

Dome

The staffer ushers Caroline past a sign—“No Visitors Beyond This Point”—and up the stairs to the congressman’s personal office in the Capitol building.

No Visitors

Inside the congressman’s office, Caroline admires the view of the National Mall from the balcony.

View

You’ll have to read the book if you want to find out how Caroline’s night ends. Or visit DC By The Book to see if the excerpt has been posted and mapped.

FrontCover-Final-300dpiA lot of the action in CONCRETE EVIDENCE, by our own Rachel Grant, takes place in DC. One of my favorite scenes is a romantic moonlit walk through the presidential memorials along the Tidal Basin:

Holding hands, Erica and Lee “walked in the darkness around the basin. She managed to drop his hand before they reached the Jefferson Memorial, and he could feel her build a barrier between them until it was as solid as the marble columns surrounding the statue of the nation’s third president.”

Carol M. Highsmith

Carol M. Highsmith

Be sure to check out this mash-up of literature, history, geography and technology: DC by the Book

But before you go, dear Reader, share your favorite setting for fiction. And K&T authors, tell us about your favorite places to set the novels you write.

Comment for a chance to win

CONCRETE EVIDENCE (Kindle or Nook).

The lucky winner will be announced on Thursday!

Happy exploring!

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